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Evil Nature of Fariñas Causes Plight of the Late Maria Theresa Carlson

Congress





welcome By: Elena Grace Flores

House Majority Leader Rodolfo Fariñas’ natural evil nature is evident in the Congress during the hearings of the Ilocos Norte 6. Joined by his colleagues in the House, they all disregard their fellow lawmaker, Imelda Marcos citing a rule that is not applicable in the first place because only the court is the right venue for corruption allegations.






Youtube video by; ANC Alerts
[VIDEO]: Guest:
Rep. Rodolfo Farinas



Love Story in Hell

The then-mayor and former movie actress lived together in Laoag. Locals were fascinated by her. They were delighted by the presence of a celebrity. Maria did not have the slightest idea that her relationship with Fariñas was a living hell. As a political neophyte in 1983, he subjected his wife to domestic violence. She only disclosed her ordeal many years later. That her husband beat her up and apparently tortured her.




Manhandling the Wife

It was a center of gossips in the Ilocos Norte provincial hospital that Fariñas indeed abused his wife since the 1980s. A public report even came out in 1988 that quoted Fariñas’s nemesis. Then Vice Governor Rolando Abadilla was the source. In that report, Abadilla said that Fariñas was “angry” with him because he witnessed the latter manhandling his wife at the provincial capitol.




Enrile Witnessed Carlson’s Plight

Fariñas was to host a dinner for then Defense Minister Juan Ponce Enrile. Enrile was the honored guest at the city’s fiesta in February 1988. Abadilla escorted Enrile to the Capitol for the dinner. But Enrile hesitated to proceed to the venue. Incidentally, he too saw “Fariñas strangling Maria.” Enrile was not noticed by the couple. He left with Abadilla and proceeded to the Fort Ilocandia Resort Hotel instead. Fariñas was furious with Abadilla for “robbing” him the opportunity to host Enrile.









Late CJ Renato Corona’s Humiliation in Congress

Fariñas was known to castigate the late Chief Justice Renato Corona. The discrepancies of his SALN was not new to all politicians. Still, he did not give Corona the benefit of the doubt. He refers to all his defenses as scapegoats. Knowing the nature of Fariñas, Enrile constantly criticizes all his comments about Corona. It looks like he did not gain the wisdom of old age unlike the notable Enrile and the truly compassionate at heart, former first lady Imelda Marcos.




http://archives.newsbreak-knowledge.ph/2001/12/12/the-unhappy-life-of-maria-theresa-carlson/




7 thoughts on “Evil Nature of Fariñas Causes Plight of the Late Maria Theresa Carlson

  1. Hayop pala tlga ang animal na yan

    1. Bakit di iyan naipakulong gago sya

  2. Kawawa naman si Maria, napakamalas niya kay farinas, ang ganda ganda pa naman niya, seloso daw si farinas, pati bodyguard niya pinagseselosan.

    1. He’s not actually jealous of his bodyguard. Infact, Maria stated before that Fariñas would use drugs and force her to use them too. Then he (Fariñas) would let her bodyguards rape/ molest her while he watch. Now, how sick is that?
      Check out this thread dated Nov. 25, 2001.. 2 days after Maria’s death and read the one written by reporter, Nini Valera whom Maria first asked for help.
      https://m.pinoyexchange.com/forums/showthread.php?t=69826

      1. *correction:
        “HIS bodyguard”

  3. Also a drug user and protector of the number 1 drug pusher at that time named alyas Pogi.

  4. Pure Evil.
    Read this article. Written 2 days after Maria Theresa Carlson’s death on Nov. 23, 2001

    PHILIPPINE DAILY INQUIRER
    ‘I may have been first
    person she asked for help’
    Posted: 1:03 AM (Manila Time) | November 25, 2001
    By Nini Valera

    Tiniest note

    IT WAS 1988. I was interviewing this lovely lady when she suddenly, secretly slipped me the tiniest note.

    I quickly glanced at it, and it read, “Please help me, I am literally being tortured.”

    It may have been the first cry of help from Maria Teresa Carlson. Then, she was only 26 years old.

    With her eyes, Carlson signaled to me not to show any reaction to what I had just read. Her husband, Rodolfo Fariñas, who was then governor of Ilocos Norte, was seated behind a huge desk only 3 feet away from us in the Fariñas’ home in Laoag City. And he was cleaning his gun seemingly oblivious to the interview.

    I was shocked. The romance of Carlson and Fariñas had captivated the public attention. There was continuing interest in the union of the Fil-American beauty and a prominent politician who graduated from the Ateneo de Manila College of Law. Which is why I was there for an interview. The Carlson story was going to be a sidebar to a series of features on a post-Marcos Ilocos Norte.

    A former teenage-beauty queen, Carlson had joined show business and at the time of her affair with the dashing governor, she was one of the stars of the top-rated 80’s TV sitcom, “Chicks to Chicks.”

    Though they already had a child by the time I interviewed Carlson, I fully expected a couple who had yet to get over their honeymoon.

    Like most celebrities, Carlson was late for the interview. She made my photographer and I wait for two hours while Fariñas played the genial host.

    When she finally came out to meet us, Carlson was in a stunning cobalt blue, long-sleeved, knee-length dress. Like the dress, Carlson was stunning. But I felt an unpleasant roughness in the palm of her right hand when we shook hands.

    There was, too, a palpable pitch of fear in her voice as she answered my questions while smoking one cigarette after another. She also kept on retouching her make up, furiously dabbing pressed powder on her chin. I thought she was only nervous about talking to a writer again after being away from show business for a while. Her TV show had been canceled in 1987.

    “I love my life now and I’m very happy,” I remember Carlson saying. She admitted that she missed the entertainment business. Before her show went off the air, she taped for the show once a week, Carlson recalled.

    She went to her tapings in Manila by bus which the Fariñas family owned. The family also owns vast landholdings in Ilocos Norte and real estate in Manila.

    That struck me as odd. This is the celebrity-wife of the governor. A governor whose net worth as of this year was estimated at over 144 million pesos. In Congress, he was named the sixth richest congressman in 1998.

    Why wasn’t a car made available to a multimillionaire’s wife for the long trip to Manila? But that did not seem to bother her.

    “I was always accompanied by a bodyguard when I went to Manila to tape for the show. I would tape the whole day and sometimes part of the night. Then we would take the bus for Laoag the following day,” she related.

    Good friends

    Tapings gave her a chance to see her good friends from show business like Carmi Martin, one of her co-stars in the sitcom. She said this had been her weekly routine until the show was canceled in 1987, and no other offers came her way, even if she had been a hit with TV audiences.

    I asked her if she still had plans to jumpstart her stalled career or if she were already contented being a mother and wife.

    “I can’t ask for more,” she said. “But I would like to appear again in the movies. I miss show business. And even if I already have a family, I would still like to work.”

    I had everything I needed for the story and my photographer had finished his last roll of film. But Carlson had not lost steam. She kept talking even if she were just repeating herself. And without missing a beat in her monologue about how happy and how lucky she was to be with Fariñas, she slipped to me the note, which I hid inside my compact after reading it then glancing at Fariñas who was cleaning his gun.

    Later, my photographer told me that he tried to take a picture of Fariñas cleaning his gun, but the gun changed his mind.

    Fariñas looked like he was not going to budge from where he was seated for as long I was talking to his wife. Still, he left the room for a few minutes, but long enough for Carlson to clutch my arm with both her hands and tell me that he beat her up and even burned her with cigarettes. She leaned closer to show me the cigarette burns on her chin, which she had tried to cover with pressed powder so they wouldn’t show in the pictures my photographer was taking.

    She also told me how Fariñas would make her do all the household work even if they had several maids, which was why her hands were rough and why she was late for the interview because she had to finish washing the dishes.

    I promised to help her. I was determined to write about her being a battered wife. I also advised her just to jump on a bus and leave him.

    “How could I? He owns the bus,” she hissed. Then there was their child, whom she said she could not leave behind with Fariñas.

    Later, back in Manila, I realized that I must have been the first person to know that their fairy-tale love story was a sham. I may have been the first person Carlson had asked for help to get her out of hell. I may have been the first person to see and feel her pain.

    I was then a desk editor of a newspaper, which the government had sequestered shortly after Edsa I in 1986. I was given an assignment for a feature series on Ilocos and what Marcos country was like two years after the former dictator had fled to Hawaii.

    Unfortunately, I never wrote the story even if I kept Carlson’s note for the longest time and showed it to everybody I knew in Manila who I thought could help her.

    I did not write the story because the senior editors of the newspaper did not want me to write it. They said Fariñas could sue us for libel. (He sued the paper later, but because of another story that had nothing to do with Carlson.)

    The editors also said I had no proof that Fariñas was beating up Carlson even if I had seen the cigarette burns on her face and heard the fear in her voice. They said Fariñas could even kill Carlson-and me.

    One editor reminded me that Carlson’s problem was a domestic matter between husband and wife. His point was for us outsiders to keep out it.

    In time, I must have convinced myself that not writing the story would be safer for everybody, especially for Carlson, who still had to live with Fariñas had my story come out in the paper.

    I also assured myself that Carlson was strong and in love and would survive the travails of her married life.

    I was wrong. And I am very sorry.

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