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David Jenyns Discloses all you’ve got to know about Authority Content

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welcome By: Elena Grace Flores
In this episode number 41 of the InnovaBuzz podcast, my guest is David Jenyns of Melbourne SEO Services and Melbourne Video Productions who talks to me about his new book Authority Content.

David Jenyns is sharing his content marketing with a system idea – Authority Content. It’s the subject of his book and you can get a free Kindle copy of that book from August 11. Here, there are many exciting tips that you can gather for straight implementation into your business particularly its online presence which is vital for businesses nowadays.

Authority Content is a structured process to build a business’s brand, credibility, and sales. If you’re not creating high-quality content, you’re really wasting your time on any other SEO efforts
Beginning with video recordings of events or other content, you can produce up to six months’ worth of content to publish across the web.
If you answer all the questions your leads might have, before they even pick up the phone to talk to you, you change the buying dynamic and their conversations with you become about how you can help them, rather than answering concerns. By constantly creating and publishing content, you are seen as a thought leader and it keeps you front of mind with your audience, as they see you as a helpful resource.
The Authority Content process is adaptable to the front of the sales funnel, to the onboarding stage or to existing customers.By providing content that helps and appeals to your audience, you become their go-to person for that topic and they become your raving fans. Listen to the Podcast by clicking the link below.

Reference: http://innovabiz.com.au/podcasts/innovabuzz-episode-41-david-jenyns-authority-content/

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Will Music Piracy settlement of $50m ends up on artists?





welcome By: Elena Grace Flores
We are talking about big piracy fines here when the owner of a music hacking portal selling pirated downloadable materials agreed to pay settlements for the damages cause to various artists – but will part of it goes to the artists themselves? Read this story:

BBC reported: The owner of piracy site Isohunt has agreed to settle a music industry group lawsuit for $50m (£38m). Gary Fung announced the settlement with Music Canada via a blog published at the weekend. Isohunt was shut down in 2013, when Mr Fung agreed to pay $110m to the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). One researcher said the cases could set a “worrying” precedent for those who run sites that may link to pirated content.

A court order associated with the decision details the fees as follows: 55m Canadian dollars in damages, C$10m in “punitive, exemplary and aggravated damages” and a further C$1m to cover legal costs. The total amounts to 50m US dollars. The case dates from a legal order sent in May 2008 by the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA), now known as Music Canada.

It added: Previously, Mr Fung had promised users that he would not disclose their data – including email and IP addresses – during legal proceedings. “I’ve kept my word regarding users’ privacy,” he wrote. Isohunt did not host pirated media, but rather provided users with a directory of sources from where illegal files could be downloaded. The same model is used by The Pirate Bay, which is currently blocked in the UK. It’s possible that cases like this could set a “worrying” precedent for social media websites, according to Ben Zevenbergen, a researcher at the Oxford Internet Institute. “Think of social media websites like Facebook where everyone shares their favourite songs with their friends – would these services need to employ full-time copyright police?” he said. He added: “Further, I truly wonder whether a penny of these fines ends up on artists’ royalty checks, but I highly doubt it.”

Reference: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36883179

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O2 Hacking shows thieves use stolen passwords to unlock other sites





welcome By: Elena Grace Flores
Many online users tend to stick only to one password for all their transactions via the world wide web to make it easier to remember but this is a serious security risk online. Computer security expert Graham Cluley said that when customer details are stolen from a website “one of the first things the criminals will try to do is see if any stolen passwords might unlock other sites online – potentially spilling more secrets about us, and opening us up to fraud and identity theft”.

BBC reported: O2 customer data is being sold by criminals on the dark net, the Victoria Derbyshire programme has learned. The data was almost certainly obtained by using usernames and passwords first stolen from gaming website XSplit three years ago to log onto O2 accounts. When the login details matched, the hackers could access O2 customer data in a process known as “credential stuffing”. O2 says it has reported the case to law enforcement, and is helping inquiries. It is highly likely that this technique will have been used to log onto other companies’ accounts too.

It added: The data for sale included user phone numbers, emails, passwords and dates of birth. It was shown to the BBC by an ethical hacker, who found the information listed for sale on a dark net market. The dark net is a part of the internet that is only visible to people using specialist web browsers, and is often used for illegal activity. BBC reporters purchased a small sample of customer details from the seller to investigate further and contacted O2. Together, the investigating teams believed it was the result of credential stuffing.
This is where a criminal uses a piece of software to repeatedly attempt to gain access to customers’ accounts by using the login details it has obtained from elsewhere – in this case, a November 2013 attack on gaming website XSplit. When successful, a customer’s details can be retrieved and sold. Computer security expert Graham Cluley said that when customer details are stolen from a website “one of the first things the criminals will try to do is see if any stolen passwords might unlock other sites online – potentially spilling more secrets about us, and opening us up to fraud and identity theft”.

All the O2 account holders whose details the BBC has seen have been informed, with many saying they had used the same login for other online accounts. Hasnain Shaw, from Chester, was one of the people whose details we obtained. His data had already been used elsewhere to access more accounts. “I was away from home when eBay contacted me to say there was some suspicious activity on my account. I checked and it looked like there were cars for sale on my account. “Four weeks ago, I got a similar email from Gumtree. It looked like the same people had got access to that account because it was the same cars being advertised.” He said he had used the same email address and password for both these accounts and the one with O2, but has since changed them. Before this happened he had considered himself secure online and internet-savvy. “I am considering using a password manager and two-step authentication, although nothing is foolproof,” he added. O2 said in a statement: “Credential stuffing is a challenge for many businesses. We have reported all the details passed to us about the seller to law enforcement and we continue to help with their investigations. “We act immediately if we are given evidence of personal credentials being taken from the internet and used to try and compromise a customer’s account.”

Reference: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36764548

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Verizon bought Yahoo to compete with Google and Facebook





welcome By: Elena Grace Flores
Why would a company buy a website for billions of dollars? Yahoo’s buyout by Verizon is a good example. When what used to be money-generating portal cannot anymore compete with up to date innovations that offers more for nothing, they could just die down or carried over by another bigger entity who has better capabilities in upgrading it. This is the very reason why Facebook keeps on adding features to the extent of providing accessibility without internet. Read this story:

BBC Wrote: Yahoo was the first website I ever visited. My Dad took me and my brother to an internet cafe in central London, and there it was – an exciting portal to the world wide web. Without it we’d have been completely lost. That hand-holding portal was at one point worth a staggering $125bn. Today, it was sold for $4.83bn (£3.7bn) to US mobile network Verizon. That’s a remarkable amount of money for a company whose name has become shorthand for online businesses falling from grace. Last quarter, Yahoo lost $440m. It may have made its name by helping us make sense of the web, but it’s long been clear that other companies do that job far better, and make much more money doing it. But Verizon won’t care about that. They want eyeballs. Bums on seats. People through the door… and on that measure, Yahoo delivers. Collectively, around a billion people flow through Yahoo’s sprawl of web properties at least once a month.
Verizon will now likely merge Yahoo with AOL, the company it bought last year for $4.4bn. A Yahoo-AOL pairing has been expected for years. The companies are like two high school friends who everyone knew would eventually get together, but only when the time was right. Or maybe when they were both a bit desperate.

It added: Anyway, Verizon’s strategy in marrying the companies is to create a massive content network of well-respected web properties. Sites like Huffington Post, Engadget, Yahoo Finance and TechCrunch will now all deliver advertising for Verizon, advertising that can be more effectively targeted given what Verizon knows about its mobile customers. It will help Verizon compete with Google and Facebook, who are way out in front when it comes to market domination of online advertising. But such is the size of the industry, being in third place would be extremely lucrative for Verizon. That’s what this deal is all about, and that’s why Yahoo commanded such a big price tag even though it has dropped off most people’s radars in recent years.
Yahoo couldn’t do it alone – it simply doesn’t have enough data on its one billion or so monthly users to target and personalise ads in the way Google and Facebook can.

The deal has concluded a four-month selling process that caught the attention of many interested parties, including rival phone network AT&T and, to many people’s surprise, the Daily Mail.
Many expected the deal to see Marissa Mayer’s roller coaster tenure as Yahoo’s boss come to an end. She could have reportedly taken a $55m severance payment, but even that extremely pleasant send off did not tempt her to leave a company that she declared her love for in an email detailing the deal. But there’s no doubt she’ll be wishing her time at Yahoo had been a more successful one. It was a rocky road – her appointment in 2012 was enthusiastically welcomed, not only due to her formidable past at Google, but also as her ability to act as a flag-bearer for women running big companies in Silicon Valley.
For that reason, her time at Yahoo may have had added scrutiny, but her time at the company has been unquestionably disappointing on many levels. Big acquisitions – like Tumblr, for $1bn – simply didn’t bring in enough extra revenue. And the site’s big gamble in trying to become a news organisation never hit the level of success Mayer presumably envisioned. Even with the help of the highly-respected US anchor Katie Couric, and scooping of “traditional” media big names such as David Pogue from the New York Times, the amount of traffic going to Yahoo’s original content hasn’t come close to justifying the cost of bringing in the big talent. Responsibility for that lies squarely at Mayer’s feet, and it all led to the bizarre situation where she was working hard to put herself out of a job by pushing through Yahoo’s sale. On this final task, she’ll will perhaps be commended. It’s not often a major tech acquisition takes place so publicly, with boardroom discussions seeping out of the walls and into the press regularly. But it seems the process was effective in pushing up Yahoo’s share price and moving Verizon to pay an extra $1.8bn on its opening bid.
We’ll hear more concrete details from Verizon in due course. It may keep using the highly recognisable Yahoo brand, it may not.
Regardless, Yahoo as a company is finished – and everybody saw it coming.

Reference: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36881101

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Video Cassette Recorders will be a thing of the past as Japan stops production

Video Cassette Recorders





welcome By: Elena Grace Flores
Perhaps not many people realized that as technology evolves, we tend to forget the cool creations of the past like the video cassette recorders or VCR machines. People were just overwhelmed when VCD, LCD and Mp3 devices manipulated the market with its handy, futuristic designs and most of all affordable automated features gave buyers no option but to take them without thinking much. Now, since VCRs are going obsolete, Japan has to stop making them. Not that many would care but this can be historic. Read through:

BBC wrote: The last videocassette recorder (VCR) in Japan will be produced by the end of the month, according to the Nikkei newspaper. Funai Electric has been producing VHS-playing VCRs for 33 years, most recently in China for Sanyo. But last year it sold just 750,000 units, down from a peak of 15 million a year, and has been finding it difficult to source the necessary parts. VCRs were introduced in the 1970s but were superseded by DVD technology. Last year, Sony announced it would stop selling Betamax video cassettes – a rival to the VHS. VCRs were required to play or record such tapes. It was 12 years ago that UK High Street retailer Dixons decided to phase out the sale of VCRs due to the popularity of DVD players.

It added: Some vintage technologies – such as vinyl – have enjoyed a renaissance. However, Tania Loeffler, an analyst at IHS Technology, does not think the same nostalgia will ever be felt for VCR-playable formats. “I don’t see VCR becoming like vinyl, where a lot of people appreciated the warmness of how something sounds on vinyl,” she told the BBC. “The quality on VHS is not something I think anyone would want to go back to.” However, she added that a niche market for accessing VHS content, perhaps for archival purposes, would probably mourn the loss of VCRs if they became unavailable.

Reference: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-36857370http://carelinkwebpr.com/cookie-policy/